Fall 2016

  • GRKM 201: Elementary Modern Greek I (credit: 5 hours)
    Instructor: Veneta Ivanova Todorova (Teaching Assistant)
    This course aims to develop elementary proficiency in spoken and written Modern Greek, as well as to introduce elements of cultural knowledge. The course will familiarize beginning students with the Greek alphabet and Modern Greek pronunciation rules, as well as basic morphology and syntax, with an emphasis on listening comprehension and reading skills, as well as basic conversational skills. Online language laboratory and Internet assignments required.

  • GRKM 403: Intermediate Modern Greek I (credit: 4 hours)
    Instructor: Veneta Ivanova Todorova (Teaching Assistant)
    This course aims to strengthen the concepts learned at the basic level and to introduce students to more complex structures of the Greek language. Specifically it aims to develop intermediate-level proficiency in spoken and written Modern Greek, as well as to introduce elements of cultural knowledge. The course will familiarize students with more complex morphology, syntax, and vocabulary in Modern Greek, with an emphasis on listening comprehension and reading skills, as well as conversational skills. Online language laboratory and Internet assignments required.

  • GRKM 453: Advanced Modern Greek I (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Veneta Ivanova Todorova (Teaching Assistant)
    This course aims to enable students to attain conversational fluency and to become independent users of the language who deal effectively and with a good deal of accuracy with familiar communication situations. Online language laboratory and Internet assignments required. Prerequisite: GRKM 404 or consent of instructor.

  • GRK 101/RLST 111: Elementary Greek I [Ancient Greek] (credit: 4 hours)
    Instructor: Whitney McComas (Teaching Assistant)
    Introduces ancient Greek (both classical and koine), including the reading of simple prose.

  • GRK 201/RLST 200: Classical & Koine Greek I (credit: 4 hours)
    Instructor: Whitney McComas (Teaching Assistant)
    Readings in classical Greek prose and narrative and epistolary New Testament texts. Prerequisite: GRK102.

  • SLCL 200/GRKM 199: Partnership in Crisis?: Greece and the EU (credit: 3 credits/ 8-week course)
    Instructor: Dr. Stefanos Katsikas
    For nearly six years the international media have been gripped by the “Greek crisis." As the crisis intensified mass protests in Athens and other major Greek cities have caught the world’s attention. Meanwhile what began as a localized fiscal deficit problem grew into a widespread crisis of epic proportions that challenged the political and social fabric of the Greek nation and at times seemed destined to undermine the very existence of a global currency, the Euro.

    This eight-week course aims to explore the lengthy crisis that has beset Greece and the wider Eurozone. Is it a purely economic phenomenon or something wider and deeper, as many Greeks would suggest? Are its causes to be found in the prevailing international financial environment or in the economic and political system that has evolved in Greece since the early 1970s? To what extent have choices made by both domestic and international actors, such as the International Monetary Fund and the European Union, assisted or exacerbated the crisis? Most importantly, what has been the impact of the crisis on the daily lives of the country’s residents, and what is this impact of the Greek crisis on the rest of the world?

  • CLCV 100: Vocab Building-GRK & Latin Roots (credit: 2 hours)
    Instructor: Whitney McComas (Teaching Assistant)
    Vocabulary building assistance for students through an analysis of Greek and Latin roots, prefixes, and suffixes found in English

  • CLCV 102: Medical Terms-GRK & LAT Roots (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Sean Minion (Teaching Assistant)
    This is an introductory course to the study of the Greek and Latin roots of contemporary medical terminology and to the Linguistic patterns governing their combination and usage.

  • CLCV 111: Mythology of Greece and Rome (credit: 2 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Jon Solomon
    This course studies of the major myths of Greece and Rome and their impact upon later art, music, and literature. Credit is not given for both CLCV 111 and CLCV 115

  • CLCV 114: Introduction to Greek Culture (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Jon Solomon
    This course studies the social and cultural life in Greece during the classical period. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for: UIUC Literature and the Arts, UIUC: Western Comparative Culture.

  • CLCV 115: Mythology of Greece and Rome (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Jon Solomon
    This course studies the major myths of Greece and Rome and their impact upon later art, music, and literature. It shares two hours of lecture with CLCV 111; additional hour of lecture-discussion for a closer analysis of topics. Credit is not given for both CLCV 115 and CLCV 111. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for: UIUC Literature and the Arts, UIUC: Western Comparative Culture.

  • CLCV 131: Classical Archaeology, Greece (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Karen Laurence
    This course offers an introduction to the archaeology of ancient Greece and the Aegean world. The course satisfies the General Education criteria for: UIUC History & Philosophy perspective; UIUC: Western Comparative Culture.

  • CLCV 160: Ancient Greek & Roman Religion (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Karen Laurence
    The course offers a study of Greek and Roman paganism and the rise of Christianity within that context. Readings are confined to ancient sources in English translation.

  • CLCV 203: Ancient Philosophy (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Robert George Wengert
    This course introduces students to ancient philosophy, concentrating on Plato and Aristotle, dealing with such topics as metaphysics, ethics, and the theory of knowledge

  • CLCV 220: Topics in Classical Literature: Fantastic Narratives of Greece and Rome (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Clara Bosak-Schroeder
    Is fantasy a recent genre? What about science fiction? This course examines fantastic narratives from ancient Greece and Rome, stories that transport their characters to the bottom of the sea, the ends of the earth, the moon, and even into other bodies. Students will read these ancient texts in dialogue with theories of “the fantastic” and scifi as a genre, asking whether and how these approaches can be applied to the ancient world, and comparing ancient texts with 20th/21st century scifi in general. To complement our reading of ancient fiction and modern genre theory, students will be asked to produce writing in a number of forms: academic, formal but nonacademic, and fictional. This course satisfies the General Education criteria for: Literature and the Arts and Western Comparative culture.

  • CLCV 220: History of Ancient Greece (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Clara Bosak-Schroeder
    This course satisfies the General Education criteria for: Literature and the Arts and Western Comparative Culture.

  • CLCV 231/ARTH 217: Development of Ancient Cities (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Karen Laurence
    This course explores monuments and archaeological surveys illustrating the development of the Greek and Roman city (polis). Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. This course satisfies the General Education criteria for: UIUC: History and Philosophy Perspective; UIUC: Western Comparative Culture
  • CLCV 410/ARCH 410: Ancient Egyptian and Greek Architecture (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. John Senseny
    This course examines architecture and urban form in Egypt and Greek world through the Hellenistic period. Prerequisite: ARCH 210, ARTH 111 or CLCV 131.

  • PS 371: Classical Political Theory (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: B. Miller (Teaching Assistant)
    This course surveys the origins and development of political thought in ancient Greek society, with a focus on central texts by Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. The three primary concepts classical political thought-power, legitimacy, and justice- have remained central in contemporary political theory. We will also explore three concepts that stand front and center in politics today, but were less important for the ancients: freedom, equality, and law. Finally, students will consider other crucial issues for the ancients that are somewhat neglected in mainstream contemporary theory, such as citizenship, education, civic friendship, and piety. Students will be looking at a variety of texts, some of which are self-consciously theoretical (Plato and Aristotle), while others are historical, satirical, and legal (Thucydides, Aeschylus, Aristophanes, Demosthenes, etc.)

  • HIST 141: Western Civilization to 1660 (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Ralph Mathisen
    Fundamental developments in the history of Western societies from antiquity to early modern Europe; includes the Greek and Roman worlds, the influence of Christianity and Islam, the emergence of medieval monarchies, the rise of cities, the commercial and intellectual revolutions of the Middle Ages, the birth of the university, the conquest and colonization of the Atlantic world, the Renaissance and Reformation, the political and religious upheavals of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Credit is not given for both HIST141 and HIST140.
    This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
    UIUC: Historical and Philosophical Perspective; UIUC: Western and Comparative Culture.

  • HIST 396: Special Topics: Eurasia: Societies & Cultures in Southeastern Europe, Anatolia, the Caucasus, & Central Asia, 16th-20th Century (credits: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Keith Hitchins
    Students explore the social, economic, and cultural development and the changing political status of the Romanians of Southeastern Europe, the Kurds of Anatolia and Iraq, the Georgians of the Caucasus, and the Kazakhs and Tajiks of Central Asia. We shall be concerned with broad trends and shall try to explain the similarities and differences of peoples of diverse ethnic origins, religious foundations, social and economic organization, and cultures (folklore, written literature, and historiography). We shall also consider the influence on our region of others, especially Western Europeans, Russians, and Iranians, and we shall measure the receptivity of our Eurasia to the modernization being promoted by the West and investigate indigenous alternatives.

  • HIST 443/MDVL 443: Byzantine Empire AD 284-717 (credits: 3 undergraduate hours/ 4 graduate hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Ralph Mathisen
    Examination of the political, social, economic, military, institutional, religious and cultural development of the early Byzantine Empire from the reign of Diocletian (AD 284-305) through the Heraclian Dynasty (AD 610-717).
  • PS 348: Government and Politics in Western Europe (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Konstantinos Kourtikakis
    This course examines the major governmental systems of continental Europe; the evolution, structure, and functioning of the political institutions of big and small Western European countries. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

  • PS 385/EURO 385/FR 385/GER 385: Politics of the European Union (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Konstantinos Kourtikakis
    This course considers the history of the European Union and its current functions and operations. It focuses on the ongoing process of political and cultural integration.Prerequisite: PS240 or PS241, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor; cross-listings require language training appropriate for enrollment in the respective overseas programs.

  • RLST 482: Muslim-Christian Interactions (credits: 3 undergraduate hours/ 4 graduate hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Valerie Hoffman
    Explores the complexity of Muslim-Christian interactions since early Islam, including theological and philosophical exchanges, debates, polemics, interfaith dialogue, perceptions of each other, Muslim minorities in the West, and Christian minorities in the Muslim world, and the relationship of religion to culture.

 

Spring 2017:

  • GRKM 202: Elementary Modern Greek II (credits: 5 hours)
    Instructor: Veneta Ivanova Todorova (Teaching Assistant)
    This course aims to develop elementary proficiency in spoken and written Modern Greek, as well as to introduce elements of cultural knowledge. The course will familiarize beginning students with the Modern Greek pronunciation rules, as well as basic morphology and syntax, with an emphasis on listening comprehension and reading skills, as well as basic conversational skills. Online language laboratory and Internet assignments required.

  • GRKM 404: Intermediate Modern Greek II (credits: 4 hours)
    Instructor: Veneta Ivanova Todorova (Teaching Assistant)
    This course aims to strengthen the concepts learned at the basic level and to introduce students to more complex structures of the Greek language. Specifically it aims to develop intermediate-level proficiency in spoken and written Modern Greek, as well as to introduce elements of cultural knowledge. The course will familiarize students with more complex morphology, syntax, and vocabulary in Modern Greek, with an emphasis on listening comprehension and reading skills, as well as conversational skills.

  • GRKM 454: Advanced Modern Greek II (credits: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Veneta Ivanova Todorova (Teaching Assistant)
    This course aims to enable students to attain conversational fluency and to become independent users of the language who deal effectively and with a good deal of accuracy with familiar communication situations. Online language laboratory and Internet assignments required. Prerequisite: GRKM 453 or consent of instructor.

  • GRK 202: Elementary Modern Greek II [Ancient Greek] (credit: 4 hours)
    Instructor: W. McComas (Teaching Assistant)
    Continuation of GRK 101. Grammar and reading in classical and koine Greek. Same as RLST 112. Prerequisite: GRK 101.

  • GRK 202: Classical & Koine Greek II (credit: 4 hours)
    Instructor: W. McComas (Teaching Assistant)
    Continuation of GRK 201. Further readings in classical Greek prose, and narrative and epistolary New Testament texts. Same as RLST 204. Prerequisite: GRK 201 or equivalent.

  • SLCL 200: Pirates, Merchants and Cross-Cultural Interactions in the Mediterranean Sea (Spring 2016) (credits: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Stefanos Katsikas
    The Mediterranean Sea was an important route for pirates, merchants and travelers and for centuries, ancient and modern civilizations, ethnic and religious groups and cultures have interacted with each other around its shores. It provided routes for trade and food by fishing and the gathering for numerous communities throughout the ages. It was the meeting point for different cultures, ethnic and religious groups from Europe, Asia, Middle East and the African continent, including the three major monotheistic religions: i.e. Christianity, Islam and Judaism.

    This eight-week course explores the history of the region and the political, economic and cultural dynamics of Mediterranean societies from antiquity to the present day. The course discusses issues such as the birth and development of ancient Greek Democracy and its present legacy, the rise of the ancient Hellenic world, the rise and fall of regional and global empires in the region the Macedonian Empire of Alexander the Great, the Roman, Byzantine, Ottoman and Arab Empires as well as the extension of the British Empire in the region, the birth of modern nation-states in the region during the 19th and 20th century and finally the region’s integration into the mainland Europe and the European Union in the 20th and 21st centuries. The course also explores the maritime history of the region, including conflicts between pirates i.e. the Knights of St. John, the Barbary corsairs and their victims, i.e. Greek and other merchants who traded in the Mediterranean waters, migration movements to and from the region, including contemporary forms of piracy and migration.

  • HIST 439: The Ottoman Empire (credit: 2 to 4 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Maria Todorova
    The course explores the ecnomy, society, law, and government, the Ottomans and Mediterranean society, Ottoman culture and Islamic tradition, minorities, trade, diplomacy, and capitulations, the “decline” and dismemberment, and traditional and westernizing attempts at revival.

  • CLCV 100: Vocab Building-GRK & LAT Roots (credit: 2 hours)
    Instructor: W. McComas (Teaching Assistant)
    Vocabulary building assistance for students through an analysis of Greek and Latin roots, prefixes, and suffixes found in English. Class Schedule Information: This course is offered exclusively online with weekly assignments, but no required class time except for exams. This section has one or more proctored exams, which may carry additional fees. Proctoring options include fee-based ProctorU and approved proctoring centers.

  • CLCV 102: Medical Terms-GRK & LAT Roots (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: S. Minion (Teaching Assistant)
    Introduction to the study of the Greek and Latin roots of contemporary medical terminology and to the linguistic patterns governing their combination and usage. This course is offered exclusively online with weekly assignments, but no required class time except for exams. This section has one or more proctored exams, which may carry additional fees. Proctoring options include fee-based ProctorU and approved proctoring centers.

  • CLCV 111: Mythology of Greece and Rome (credit: 2 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Jon Solomon
    Study of the major myths of Greece and Rome and their impact upon later art, music, and literature. Credit is not given for both CLCV 111 and CLCV 115

  • CLCV 115: Mythology of Greece and Rome (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Jon Solomon
    Studies the major myths of Greece and Rome and their impact upon later art, music, and literature. Shares two hours of lecture with CLCV 111; additional hour of lecture-discussion for a closer analysis of topics. Credit is not given for both CLCV 115 and CLCV 111. In the Fall and Spring semesters, students must register for one discussion and one lecture section. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a: UIUC: Literature and the Arts; UIUC: Western Comparative Culture.

  • CLCV 120: The Classical Tradition (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Jon Solomon
    The course offers a survey of the Greco-Roman tradition from late antiquity to the present. Examination of pagan culture in medieval Christianity and Islam, the literary tradition of the Troy tale, the rediscovery of Greek texts and the Florentine Renaissance, classical allusions in Shakespeare and Milton, the political foundation of the U.S. constitution, and the persistence of the classical tradition in contemporary American popular culture. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a: UIUC: Literature and the Arts; UIUC: Western Comparative Culture
  • CLCV 220: Origins of Western Literature (Credit: 3 hours)
    Instructors: Dr. Daniel Ruiz Leon
    The course explores origins and development of selected major genres in Western literature, emphasizing the relationship between classical representatives and their modern successors. Same as CWL 220. May be repeated as topic varies. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a: UIUC:Literature and the Arts; UIUC: Western Comparative Culture


    Topics include
    :
    Sports and Society in Ancient Greece & Rome: This course is a study of the role of sport in the Classical world, covering the period from roughly 3000 B.C.E. to the third century C.E., from the Bronze Age to the rise of Christianity and the decline of Greek sanctuaries. It will focus on the complex and sometimes controversial role that sports played in these cultures using a variety of ancient sources. We will explore such topics as the origins of Greek sport, the role of the gymnasium in the ancient world, the ancient Olympics, sport in Greek and Roman literature, and the history of gladiators and chariot racing in the Roman Empire

    Alexander the Great and His Legacy: In this course we will examine the life of Alexander the Great and the ancient Mediterranean world in which he lived. We will also look at the impact he had on the historical development of that world after his death, the political use of his legacy from antiquity to the 21st century, and the fascination he continues to inspire. In addition to mastering the basic facts of Alexander's life, you will be asked to investigate where those facts come from, how and why they have been manipulated over time, and how all of this affects your understanding of the study of history in general.

  • CLCV 222: The Tragic Spirit (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: Dr. Ariana Traill
    Readings in the tragic drama of Greece and Rome; a systematic study of the contents and development of this classical literary/ dramatic genre. Same as CWL 264. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a: UIUC: Literature and the Arts; UIUC: Western Comparative Culture

  • CLCV 410: Ancient Egyptian & Greek Arch (credit: 3 hours)
    Instructor: John Senseney
    Architecture and urban form in Egypt and the Greek world through the Hellenistic period. Same as ARCH410. See ARCH 410